All Right? is a Healthy Christchurch initiative led by the Canterbury District Health Board and the Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand.

We are funded by the Ministry of Health and have also had support from the Ministry of Social Development and many other organisations including the Red Cross, SKIP, the Christchurch City Council and the Waimakariri District Council.

All Right? completes regular, indepth research into how Cantabrians are doing. This gives us a wealth of up-to-date knowledge about how people are feeling and the hurdles they are facing.

This research informs everything All Right? does – from raising awareness among community groups, organisations and businesses, to creating tools that promote the things we can do to improve our wellbeing.

If you're in Canterbury you might have spotted All Right? on billboards, in newspapers, on noticeboards, on buses and bus stops, and on people's chests (badges… not tattoos!). You may have even heard us on the radio and seen us on Facebook.

We're always open to new ideas, so if you have any thoughts or suggestions, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

Where we came from

The Greater Christchurch Psychosocial Committee mandated the development of our project after the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor, Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, wrote a briefing paper on the likely psychosocial effects of the earthquakes and how to mitigate these.

 “A comprehensive and effective psychosocial recovery programme needs to support the majority of the population who need some psychosocial support within the community (such as basic listening, information and community-led interventions) to allow their innate psychological resilience and coping mechanisms to come to the fore." 

- Professor Sir Peter Gluckman

The difference we've made

Since we launched in February 2013, All Right? has been overwhelmed with positive feedback.

 “Because of the wonderful flags I was prompted to get on the website and found I was able to access funded counselling. I have had five sessions and they have helped me ENORMOUSLY!!!!!! YAY!!! Thank you thank you thank you!!!!"

 “I had a few badges given to me over the weekend, so I offered them to my form class (CGHS) today and I was *mobbed*. The girls started talking about how they are not feeling "all right" about everything and they asked me to please get them all badges, and some for their friends."

 “I went back from work feeling a bit down the other day and without really knowing why. I opened the Press and saw the ad "It's all right to feel overwhelmed some days". I felt relieved, like someone had just read my mind. This ad is now on the dresser in my bedroom and every time I feel blue, I just look at it. Thank you for this."

 "I work as a clown doctor in the children's ward and today we used your compliments as part of our 'rounds'. I cut them from The Press. We had lots of fun letting children and parents randomly pick a compliment and then basked in the joy of complimenting each other as well as pretending to be ninjas and frolicking in fields etc. Thanks for all you do."

 “I saw your compliment tags hanging up on Riccarton Road and picked one up. I saw this beautiful elderly lady walking by herself through the mall so I departed my friends, passed her the tag and said: "You are amazing. Even when you don't always think so". She put her arm around me and gave me a big, genuine smile and said I was the nicest young lady she had ever met. It was a very nice feeling seeing someone I didn't know light up and pay a compliment back to me. Love this campaign you guys have going. Ka pai!"

 “I love the community spirit of the All Right? campaign. It makes me think about one of my favourite Whakatauki. "Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, engari he toa takitini ke." My strength does not come from me alone, but also from others."

How the campaign is working

The campaign is frequently evaluated for effectiveness to ensure it is on the right track. Our latest evaluation in July 2016 showed that 76% of Cantabrians were aware of the campaign.

Click here to read more about the All Right? impact